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PHM from Pittsburgh

Welcome to the first in a series of podcasts on pediatric hospital medicine. This series was created to keep the busy physician of today informed and up to date on some of the most important diagnoses and issues we face every day in the care of hospitalized children. There is free CME associated with this via the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC). After you have listened to the podcast just go to the link below, sign in and follow the directions, take the short quiz and get your free CME credit.
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Now displaying: September, 2019
Sep 18, 2019

Course: Migrant Detention Centers Through the Eyes of a Pediatrician

Course Director: Tony R Tarchichi M.D.  - Assistant Professor in Dept of Pediatrics, UPMC Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh

Course Director: Julie Linton M.D. - Chair of the American Academy of Pediatrics Immigrant Health Special Interest Group. 

Disclosures: No relationships with industry relevant to the content of this educational activity have been disclosed.

Target Audience: This Podcast series was created for Pediatric Hospitalists or those healthcare professionals who take care of hospitalized children. 

This episode is Migrant Detention Centers Through the Eyes of a Pediatrician. As always there is free CME credit of up to 1 AMA category 1 for listening to this podcast and going to the Univ of Pitt site. See the link below. 

______________________________________________________

Objectives: Upon completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

1. Review the current policy of US detaining migrants seeking entry into the US either for asylum or other reasons.

2. Review the current conditions of children in the migrant detention centers in the USA. 

3. Review the community aspects of migrant children seeking asylum including seeking access to medical care, legal representation (and partnership between physicians and lawyers) and educational needs. 

______________________________________________________

Released:  9/24/2019, Reviewed 9/24/2019, Expire: 9/24/2021

All presenters disclosure of relevant financial relationships with any entity producing, marketing, re-selling, or distributing health care goods or services, used on, or consumed by, patients is listed above.  No other planners, members of the planning committee, speakers, presenters, authors, content reviewers and/or anyone else in a position to control the content of this education activity have relevant financial relationships to disclose.

If you are new to the Internet-based Studies in Education and Research (ISER) website (which is how you will get your CME credit), you will first need to create an account:

Step 1. Create an Account

https://www.hsconnect.pitt.edu/HSC/home/create-account.do

If you have used the ISER website in the past, you can click on the link below and then log onto in order to complete the evaluation for this training:

Step 2. To access the test for CME credit:

https://cme.hs.pitt.edu/ISER/app/learner/loadModule?moduleId=21015 

Accreditation Statement:

This activity is approved for the following credit: AMA PRA Category 1 Creditâ„¢. Other health care professionals will receive a certificate of attendance confirming the number of contact hours commensurate with the extent of participation in this activity.

In support of improving patient care, the University of Pittsburgh is jointly accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME), the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE), and the American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC), to provide continuing education for the healthcare team.

The University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of  (1.0)  AMA PRA Category 1 CreditsTM. Physicians should only claim credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

Sep 3, 2019

Course: Review of Constipation

Course Director: Tony R Tarchichi M.D.  - Assistant Professor in Dept of Pediatrics

Course Director: Arvind Srinath M.D. - Assistant Professor in the Dept of Pediatrics  

Disclosures: None

This Podcast series was created for Pediatric Hospitalists or those healthcare professionals who take care of hospitalized children. 

This episode is a Review of Constipation. As always there is free CME credit of up to 1.25 AMA category 1 for listening to this podcast and going to the Univ of Pitt site. See the link below. 

______________________________________________________

Objectives: Upon completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

1. Understand the pathophysiology of constipation.

2. Review the epidemiology of inpatient pediatric constipation and how it has increased.

3. Review treatment options and current guidelines for constipation in children. 

______________________________________________________

Released:  9/5/2019, Reviewed 9/5/2019, Expire: 9/5/2020

If you are new to the Internet-based Studies in Education and Research (ISER) website (which is how you will get your CME credit), you will first need to create an account:

Step 1. Create an Account

https://www.hsconnect.pitt.edu/HSC/home/create-account.do

If you have used the ISER website in the past, you can click on the link below and then log onto in order to complete the evaluation for this training:

Step 2. To access the test for CME credit:

https://cme.hs.pitt.edu/ISER/app/learner/loadModule?moduleId=20914

Accreditation Statement:

The University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

The University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of  (1.25 AMA PRA Category 1 CreditsTM. Physicians should only claim credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

 

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